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Thread: STEER TIRE WEIGHT LIMIT

  1. #1

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    Default STEER TIRE WEIGHT LIMIT

    Has anyone ever heard of being overweight because your steer tire rating?

    We recently got an overweight ticket in OR on I-84. We only had 8850 lbs on and the tag axle was down. They freight was chemical totes and they were down the middle of the box. They said we were overweight on the front by 2050 lbs. Put us out of service 'til we rearranged the load to the back of the truck.

    Here are the numbers as stated on the ticket. Hope someone can help explain it to me {Yes hubby tried but I'm just a girl and I need more than 1 explanation}

    2050-over

    14,400-alleged
    12,350-limit

    14,400-22,400=36,800
    static weight sidewall allowed
    6,175 x 2=12,350
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    I'll look tonight when Iget home, but there is a formula for the number of square inches of tire on the pavement = amount of weight allowed on that axle.

    Haven't seen it used since most states went to enforcing the federal bridge weight limits. 12k on single tire axles, 20k on single dual tire axle, 34k on dual tandem axles (8 tires)

    It'll be late, in Amarillo now...

    Dennis
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    I haven't heard of that one being used for years, but i guess it 's still being used when they can't get you for anything else.
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    Sparkles, look here: http://www.aitaonline.com/Info/Weigh...%20Limits.html Looks like Oregon still uses the lbs/inch scale

    Not too many states left that do. I wish they would all standardize to the federal regs.
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    Thanks Dennis, you're a sweetheart. I was so afraid someone was just going to call me "STUPID" that I hesitated even asking the question. Should have known better. We have the best bunch of people here. Can't thank you guys enough for helping me understand it better and making me realize that it "WAS JUST AN OREGON THING!!!" We had never had a problem before and have carried MUCH MORE weight. Won't be doing that in OR again!!
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  6. #6
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    Perhaps I am missing something here.

    From what you posted it looks like you got busted for being overweight on your tires. The axle weight is the max of the weakest part. For example. If you have a steering axle rated at 14,000 pounds but put a pair of tires on your steer rated for only 5,000 pounds each you would have a max gross steering axle weight of 10,000 pounds as 2 x 5,000 is 10,000.

    Conversely if you put tires on the steer rated at 8,000 pounds each while the axle was rated to 14,000 you wold still only be legal for 14,000 pounds.

    I have a feeling this is what got you a ticket.

  7. #7

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    What made me think of the inch# limits was the 12350 rating on the front axle. Didn't sound like a mfg rating, or other rating that I was familiar with. But, who knows??

    Found this in an archived article at e-trucker.com

    The bottom line on truck size and weights according to the FHWA: The differences among states on size and weight issues are increasing over time because of “differences in local and/or regional political choices that have been made” regarding freight movement. Federal efforts at standardizing truck size and weight are limited to the national network, while states make their own choices for roads under their control.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by D. Green
    What made me think of the inch# limits was the 12350 rating on the front axle. Didn't sound like a mfg rating, or other rating that I was familiar with. But, who knows??
    Of course it is also possible I have misunderstood something. What made me think of that is two fold. First, what she posted about sidewall rating of 6175 pounds. The second thing was I remember my father getting a ticket in NJ for overload due to under rated tires.

    Found this in an archived article at e-trucker.com

    The bottom line on truck size and weights according to the FHWA: The differences among states on size and weight issues are increasing over time because of “differences in local and/or regional political choices that have been made” regarding freight movement. Federal efforts at standardizing truck size and weight are limited to the national network, while states make their own choices for roads under their control.
    So does that mean if I am on a US highway or interstate I would be able to run an 80K pound rig even if the state's limit was something like 73,500??

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    while states make their own choices for roads under their control.

    I bet you would get this arguement, & spend double on an attorney to fight it

    I usually just admit defeat on tickets that are not moving or safety violations, if the fine isn't too high. I know that's what the states want, but the time/money involved in contesting is usually much greater than the fine.
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  10. #10

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    Pick up a copy of a Motor Carrier atlas and look at the size and weight limit section. There is a lot of variance from state to state on steering axle regulations. I notice Oregon is 600# per inch tire width. Some states are as low as 550 and some up to #700 also many have no stated limit. Used to be that most states stated 12,000# for steering axle but was very loosely enforced. One of our past posters here was 12,400 empty on steering axle and never had a problem

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